Marriage poems

A wedding is the most special day of your life, so finding the right words to express how you feel about marriage and getting married is incredibly important. We’ve found the finest love poems for weddings right here at Love Poems For Her. If you’re looking for a poem for a wedding invitation, for a wedding speech, for a reading or even as part of your vows, you’ll find the best love poems about getting married here.

How Wonderful is Love – Florence Earle Coates, 1916

Terrible!Average.Good.Great.Loved it! (18 votes, average: 3.67 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

How Wonderful is Love

How wonderful is love!
More wonderful, I wis1,
Than cherry-blossoms are when spring’s first kiss
Warms the chill breast of earth,

Read the rest of this page »

  1. archaic word meaning to know. Pronounced “whiss” []

Peace – Sara Teasdale, 1915

Terrible!Average.Good.Great.Loved it! (14 votes, average: 3.29 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

Peace

Peace flows into me
As the tide to the pool by the shore;
It is mine forevermore,
It will not ebb like the sea.

Read the rest of this page »

Love’s Seasons – Paul Dunbar, 1913

Terrible!Average.Good.Great.Loved it! (19 votes, average: 3.53 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

Love’s Seasons

When the bees are humming in the honeysuckle vine
And the summer days are in their bloom,
Then my love is deepest, oh, dearest heart of mine,
When the bees are humming in the honeysuckle vine.

Read the rest of this page »

The Bargain – Sir Philip Sidney, ca. 1575

Terrible!Average.Good.Great.Loved it! (20 votes, average: 3.55 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

The Bargain

My true love hath my heart, and I have his,
By just exchange one for another given:
I hold his dear, and mine he cannot miss,
There never was a better bargain driven:

Read the rest of this page »

The Avenue – Frances Cornford, 1910

Terrible!Average.Good.Great.Loved it! (11 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

The Avenue

Who has not seen their lover
Walking at ease,
Walking like any other
A pavement under trees,

Read the rest of this page »

Sonnet 18 (“Shall I compare thee…”) – William Shakespeare, 1609

Terrible!Average.Good.Great.Loved it! (25 votes, average: 3.84 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

Sonnet 18

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date.

Read the rest of this page »

The Good-Morrow – John Donne, ca. 1600

Terrible!Average.Good.Great.Loved it! (10 votes, average: 3.60 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

The Good-Morrow

I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the seven sleepers’ den?

Read the rest of this page »

Sonnet 116 – William Shakespeare, 1609

Terrible!Average.Good.Great.Loved it! (10 votes, average: 3.10 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

Sonnet 116

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:

Read the rest of this page »

On Love – Khalil Gibran, 1923

Terrible!Average.Good.Great.Loved it! (6 votes, average: 3.17 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

The full text of this poem can be read at Wikiquote.

Khalil Gibran was a radical poet who purposefully bucked tradition. His 1923 poem On Love embodies this attitude; the text rejects traditional, sentimental ideas of what it means to be in love.

Read the rest of this page »

On Marriage – Khalil Gibran, 1923

Terrible!Average.Good.Great.Loved it! (10 votes, average: 3.00 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

The full text of this poem can be read at Wikiquote.

Taken from his 1923 collection The Prophet, this poem thoughtfully explores what it means to marry another person. Less traditional than many other popular marriage poems, the text describes the importance of not only being together but also maintaining one’s independence, even within a relationship.

Read the rest of this page »

“How do I love thee? Let me count the ways…” – Elizabeth Barrett Browning, 1850

Terrible!Average.Good.Great.Loved it! (43 votes, average: 3.65 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.

Read the rest of this page »